The more I reflect on life, the more I watch people, the more I realize that we have grown too old.  If you look at the life of a child there is so much energy and life while most of us who have grown too old have become tired due to living in distractions.  Grown-ups need to grow down and stop thinking of ourselves. Let’s take a look at the differences between children and grown-ups :

  • A Child wants to play.
  • A Grown-up needs toys.

  • A Child wants to please his parents.
  • A Grown-up needs to please her self.

  • A Child needs love, unconditional love.
  • A Grown-up desires pleasure which he labels love. If he is truly “old” he will label it unconditional love so that there is no accountability.

  • A Child explores.
  • A Grown-up gets bored.

  • A Child believes in others.
  • A Grown-up believes in himself.

  • A Child desires to help others starting with the people they encounter.
  • A Grown-up sends inconsequential money to far-off lands to appease his conscience.

  • A Child trusts in authority, like parents.
  • A Grown-up does not trust unless they can get something out of it.

  • A Child has fun.
  • A Grown-up chases after distractions.

  • A Child has wonder.
  • A Grown-up shuffles from event to event just stuck in the actions.

  • A Child loves.
  • A Grown-up takes.

If we look at the lives of children (except those who have grown-up too fast) we can see that the nature of what we should be is one of being young.  This is not being childish (that’s being old), nor is it chasing after distractions (those who do are the oldest of all).

“A child kicks his legs rhythmically through excess, not absence, of life. Because children have abounding vitality, because they are in spirit fierce and free, therefore they want things repeated and unchanged. They always say, “Do it again”; and the grown-up person does it again until he is nearly dead. For grown-up people are not strong enough to exult in monotony. But perhaps God is strong enough to exult in monotony. It is possible that God says every morning, “Do it again” to the sun; and every evening, “Do it again” to the moon. It may not be automatic necessity that makes all daisies alike; it may be that God makes every daisy separately, but has never got tired of making them. It may be that He has the eternal appetite of infancy; for we have sinned and grown old, and our Father is younger than we.” – G.K. Chesterton (Orthodoxy chapter 4)