More Fun with Shakespeare! (Sillyquies)

5 03 2012

To run, or not to run   by   Billy F.

To run,or not to run: that is the question,

Whether’tis colder in the feet to suffer

Theice and snow of my yard

Or totake steps against the cold of my yard

And byopposing end it? To run: to fall

Nomore and, by a fall to say, we end

Thecold and the thousand natural cuts

Thatfeet are heir to ’tis a consummation

Devoutlyto be wish’d to walk, to fall

To layperchance to cold, ay there’s the problem

For inthe fall of death what toe fungus might infect?

Whenwe have shuffled off these cold feet

Must we give pause? To ice

For who would bear the cold and ice of my yard

The oppresses fall and the runners win

To solve or not to solve by  Madison

To solve or not to solve: that is the question

whether ’tis nobler to do the right mathematics

or the slings and arrows of logic and reasoning

or to take the arms of algebra or calculus

and by opposing solve the?

To solve, to determine, to determine; and by determine we end

the confusion is heir to, ’tis a consummation

devoutly to be wished.

To solve, to determine, to determine: pechance a drean to buy a mathematics book:

ay, there’s the answer

Soliloquy by Zack M.

To learn, or not to learn: that is the question,

Whether ‘tis nobler in the mind to suffer,

The slings and arrows of outrageous urges to slack,

Or to take arms against a sea of challenges,

And by opposing, end them? To learn: to slack,

No more; and, by concentrating to say: we end,

The heart-ache and the thousand natural challenges,

That mind is heir to, a consummation,

Devoutly to be wish’d. To learn: to slack,

To slack: a chance to sleep,

For in that sleep what dreams may come,

When we have shuffled all this mortal slacking.

Soliloquy by Wylie H.

To pull or not to pull

To pull or not to pull, that is the question:

Whether ‘tis better for us  to  pull

The lever of the tractor beam

Or to grab one amongst a sea of cows

And by grabbing pull it to the saucer;

No more; for, the cow may be hurt

By the tugging of the hand and the thousand natural shakes

That hands are heir to, ‘tis a happy cow

Devoutly to be wished. To pull, to strain;

To strain, perchance to injure: ay there’s a question;

For in the pain of strain why not use the tractor beam?

To Take a Cookie or not to Take a Cookie  by Sebastian D.

To take a cookie or not to take a cookie: that is the question

Whether‘tis nobler in the mouth to suffer

The wrath of disgraceful parents,

Or beararms against the wrath of trouble

And byhiding end it? To get a beating, to cry;

No more;and by a beating, we mean an end

The stomachache and the thousand angry yells

That earsare heir to, ‘tis consumption

Devoutly to eat. To ache, to eat;

To eat: perchanced to munch: ay, there’s the chocolate chip

For in that stomach ache of death, dreams may come

 To Breathe, or Not to Breathe  by  V. Miller

To Breathe or Not to Breathe: that is the question:

Whether ‘tis nobler of the mind to suffer

oxygen deprivation from the lungs,

Or to take arms against cigarette smoke,

And by opposing, end it? To breathe: to be free;

No more; and, by a held breath, to say we end

The lung-ache and the thousand unnatural products

That cigarettes comprise, ‘tis a consummation

Devoutly to be wish’d. To breathe, to be free;

To be free: perchance to dream: aye, there’s the stench

For in the freedom of breathing, what cancers may come

When we have taken the breath,

Must give us pause. There’s the respect

That shortens our life.

Lilje’s Soliloquy  by  Lily B.

Tochange font, or not to change font: that is the question:

Whether‘tis nobler to stay to Times New Roman

Tobrave the typos and glitches of outrageous boredom,

Orto take arms against the sea of requirements,

Andby opposing such, end such? To not type, to write;

Nomore; and by not typing to say we end

The finger-acheand the million natural sores

Thatknuckles are heir to, ‘tis a final word

Sincerelyto be typed. To not type, to write;

Tonot type, and if to find another cure to boredom, ay, there’s the trouble;

Forin not typing what new remedies may come

Whenwe have started to write by hand,

Mustgive our hands rest. Respect thy hands

Thatmakes chaos in a long essay.

A Hamlet Parody  by  Lindsey H.

To write, or not to write: that is the question:

Whether‘tis nobler in the pen to suffer

Thepain of writing to your grandmother,

Orto battle the potent pen on paper,

Andby opposing end it? To scribble: to scrawl;

Nomore; and, by a scrawl to say we careless

Theagonizing torture and the thousand penetrating nags

That afflict us, ‘tis a culmination

Sincerely to be dreamt. To scribble, to scrawl;

To scrawl: conceivably to vividness: ay, there’s the blankness;

Forin that moment of torture what bedtimes may arise

When we have drained out this dreaded ink

Musterupt in triumph. There’s the respect

 

Messy Room Soliloquy    by  Ryan Q.

To clean or not to clean: that is the question:

Whether ‘tis wiser in the mind to tire the toil and boredom of pointless boredom,

Or to not clean the mess in the room,

And by ignoring the mess, leave it?

To play: to ignore; not clean;

And by ignoring the mess we end the toil and thousand scattered objects that I’m meant to clean,

‘Tis a required task to do.

To play, to ignore; to ignore: perchance to play:

Ah, there’s the problem; for when we have ignored this messy room,

We have time to play,

But I’ll clean the room anyway

 

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Humor with Shakespeare

2 03 2012

This week I asked my students to create a parody of Hamlet’s fourth soliloquy.

Here is the original…

To be, or not to be

To be, or not to be: that is the question:
Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer
The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,
Or to take arms against a sea of troubles,
And by opposing end them? To die: to sleep;
No more; and by a sleep to say we end
The heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks
That flesh is heir to, 'tis a consummation
Devoutly to be wish'd. To die, to sleep;
To sleep: perchance to dream: ay, there's the rub;
For in that sleep of death what dreams may come

Have fun reading these great humorous renditions of Shakespeare……………

To Pick or Not to Pick Soliloquy

by Ciera J.

To pick, or not to pick: that is the question:

Whether ‘tis nobler in the nose to bleed

From the edge and thickness of the human finger

Or take arms against a nose full of mucus

And by using a tissue, end it? To mine for gold;

No more; and, by mine to say we empty

The muck and the thousand natural globs

The nose is heir to, ‘tis a constipation

Of the nose to be picked. To not to pick, to pick;

To pick: perchance to empty the nose: ay, there’s the pick;

For in that emptying of the nose what gold you may find

When we have picked this mortal snot,

Must give us jewels.

Hamlet Soliloquy

by Avery F.

To fart or not to fart; that is the question

Whether it is nobler in the mind to suffer the slings and arrows of public humiliation

Or to take arms against a sea of constipation

And by opposing end a flawless reputation? To fart, to release

No more; and, by a fart to say we end,

The abdominal pain and the thousand natural diseases

That the body is heir to.

Devoutly to be wished; to fart, to release.

Ay, there’s the rub.

For in the fart of truth what stench may escape?

When I have shuffled out this precious wind

To Cross or Not to Cross

by Evan R.

To cross or not to cross: that is the question:

Whether ‘tis nobler in the body to suffer the pain of car bumpers and wheels of outrageous,burden

or to sprint across the road of troubles,

And by running end it? To run: to walk;

No more; and,by a walk to say we end,

The heartache of a thousand steel cars

That flesh is heir to. ‘tis a running

Devoutly tobe wish’d. To run: to walk;

Perchance to fall: ay, there’s the scratch

For in that walk of death what falls may come.

 To run, or not to run

by Billy F.

To run, or not to run: that is the question,

Whether ’tis colder in the feet to suffer

The ice and snow of my yard

Or to take steps against the cold of my yard

And by opposing end it? To run: to fall

No more and, by a fall to say, we end

The cold and the thousand natural cuts

That feet are heir to ’tis a consummation

Devoutly to be wish’d to walk, to fall

To lay perchance to cold, ay there’s the problem

For in the fall of death what toe fungus might infect?

When we have shuffled off these cold feet

Must we give pause? To ice

For who would bear the cold and ice of my yard

The oppresses fall and the runners win

To Move Or Not To Move

by Sophia W.

To move or not to move: that is the question:

Whether ‘tis better for the light to leave

The warmth and coziness of blanketed beds,

Or to take arms against the shining lights,

And by turning them off? To move: to freeze;

No warmth; and, by a light to say we end

The peaceful night and the thousand naturaldreams

That sleep is heir to, ‘tis a disruption

Here to be turned off. To move, to freeze;

To freeze: wake in a day: ay, there’s the rub;

For in that awakening of light, what day may come

To Text, or Not To Text

By Kaleb P.

To text, or not to text, that is the question:

Whether ‘tis nobler in the school to suffer

The yelling at you of the teacher for not,

Or to take arms against the sea of zeros,

And by opposing end them? To text, to fail;

Much more, and by a text we do fail;

Receive and loathe the thousand natural F’s

That mind is heir to, ‘tis a horrible halt

Gladly to be thought of,

To text, surely fail; Oh, there’s the F.

For in that text of dumb,

What words may come!

ToLick, or Not to Lick?

Tristan M.

To lick, or not to lick: thatis the question,

Whether ‘tis nastier on the tongue to lick

The floors and walls of your mother’s bathroom,

Or to take arms against the sea of bacteria,

And thus by disinfecting, end them? To die: to taste;

Mouth wash; and by a taste to say we enjoyed

The stomach-ache and the thousand natural tastes

That the tongue is heir to,‘tis a consumation

Devoutly to be eaten. To die,to taste;

To taste perchance to lick: ay,there’s the rum;

For in that taste of death what gags may come

When we have wiped off this nasty slime,

Must give us a taste. There’sthe respite

That makes regurgitation of solong bile;

For who would bear the licks and tastes of time,

The licker’s wrong, the vile man’sconsumly,

The pangs of stomach ulcers,the licks delay,

The sauce of office, and the spurns

That patient volatile of disgusting takes,

When he himself might his gorge take

With a solitary bottle? Who would hurdles tear,

To grunt and sweat under a tremendous burden,

But that the taste of bile after disgorge,

The despised tongue from whose born

No traveler enjoys, tastes at will,

And makes us bear those spills we have

Than fly to utters that we know not of?

Thus contents make sissies of us all;

And thus the native hug of germs revolution

Is sickened o’er the pale cast of soap,

And enterprises of great pitchand throw up

With this retard his effortsturn awry,

And lose the face of election.Coughed you now!

My fair Toothbrush! Nymph, in thy scrubbing

Be all my toothache sremembered.





The Importance of Passion by Sophia Wieber 6 Grade

24 01 2012

“Once you do something you love, you never have work again,” Willie Hill. Your passion is not a burden or any work. It is something you choose to do because you want to, not because of a manacle disallowing you to follow your dream. A boy in high school can choose a class he has a passion for. He will be rapt, attentive and have dexterity of the subject. When he has a job, it would not be work because it is his passion. It will be manifest that he chose a career because he loved it, not because it was easy. He will work efficiently like a child playing a favorite game, because to him, this is the climax to the game of life. If you have a passion, you will succeed in that part of life.





How do I find my passion? by Ryan Q 5th grade

24 01 2012

To find my passion, I experiment and take observations. Experimenting with different subjects is a common practice I do, and I take mental notes and observe anything that could lead to my passion. One little detail that slips past an eye, one little slip, could lose the most intriguing passion I have ever known. I always have my eyes open, my ears listening, and even my nose smelling to catch a passion. These powerful senses are ready to catch those tiny slips, for one missed word on a sign could lose a passion.

I observe to see if something is missing in my life, or if one subject is to empty, or bland. I always finish signs I read the best I can, to discover a possible passion. A passion is influential on a person’s life, and I always am trying to find the most influential one, the one that speaks loudest to me. “Your work is to discover your work, and then with all your heart to give yourself to it,” Buddha.





How Have I Practiced Resilience in a gifted class? Nate Lanza 5th grade

24 01 2012

Resilience is a great trait to have. If you can bounce back, life will be like an eternal trampoline, so when you fall off the high wire, you will simply bounce back. Early in life, you will fail commonly. However, this can be good. Failing builds resilience. The more you fail, the more resilience you will have. When I first came into a full-time GATE classroom, I started too fail miserably. But I learned from my mistakes.Now, I am getting high grades, all due to resilience. I constructed mytrampoline.

Some people use the material provided by failure to build a concrete landing area instead of a trampoline. Some people act perfectionist,fearing failure so much that they don’t try new things. They walk onto the highwire with all the support they can get, intent on not falling at all. However, ifthey let their support do all the work, they will eventually fall, withcatastrophic results. You need resilience. When I fail, I use it to build my trampoline, an example I hope other people follow.





How do I find my passion? Nate Lanza 5th grade

24 01 2012

Finding a true passion is a very difficult task. It’s like trying to steer a massive airplane through a zero visibility storm during a meteor shower. At the start of life, you have no idea what you like, in the way a storm can provide zero visibility. The meteors are the challenges of life, hurling at you as you search for your passion. “I wonder. I wonder why I wonder. I wonder why I wonder why I wonder.”-Richard Feynman. There are many unanswered things out there that you can wonder about. Wondering leads to passion, for at the heart of passion is wonder. That is how I find mypassion.





How Do I Find My Passion? by Lily Brucker 6th grade

24 01 2012

There are many methods of problem solving, but among these is trial and error. Usually brushed aside by less time consuming methods, this can actually be helpful in life. When finding a passion, trial and error is probably more effective than any other mathematical method. Trying many activities, looking up numerous occupations, shines a flashlight in the cave of possibilities. And with that flashlight we find the vein of gold embedded in rock, our passion, waiting to be mined out.